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All Artists

 

 

Dennis Pitre

Kith Folk

Dennis Pitre from Tignish Shore is a fiddler with the West Prince style of playing. As his accompanist, Vincent Doucette says: "He is the best fiddler this end of the island from Egmont Bay to the North Cape".  He started fiddling when he was 12 years old and bought his first fiddle for $20 with money that he earned by collecting bottles. For years he played in a band for weekly dances at the Tignish Fire Hall. For more information on Dennis Pitre, including stories, photos, audio and video clips, go to Bowing Down Home

Toussaint Arsenault

Kith Folk

Toussaint Arsenault was a Prince County fiddler who grew up in Egmont Bay but later moved to Summerside. His fiddle style was influenced by the Evangeline fiddlers such as Joseph Bibienne Arsenault and Joseph's daughter Zélie-Anne. He was friends with the fiddling barber Ervan Sonier and they would often hang out in the barbershop after hours playing tunes. They also performed together and after Toussaint suffered a stroke, he relied on Ervan to help him remember the tunes. There are some great photos and recordings of Ervan and Toussaint on the Bowing Down Home website.

Ervan Sonier

Kith Folk

Ervan Sonier had a barber shop in eastern Prince county and often would hang out and play tunes with his friend Toussaint Arsenault. They swapped tunes and often performed together fro public events. Ervan also composed tunes, including Seaweed Reel and Mug and Brush Reel. From more information, including photos, recordings, and oral histories, go to Bowing Down Home.

Delphine Arsenault

Kith Folk

Delphine Arsenault, from Abrams Village PEI, was one of the talented daughters of Joseph Arsenault (Jos Bibienne). She played fiddle, harmonica, and pump organ and was also an accomplished singer and step dancer, along with her sister Zélie-Anne. For more information on Delphine, along with some great photos and recordings from folklorist Georges Arsenault, go to Bowing Down Home

Jaddus Gallant

Kith Folk

Jaddus Gallant, c. 1970 (collection of Faustin Gallant)

Jaddus Gallant, c. 1970 (collection of Faustin Gallant)

Jaddus Gallant from Cap-Egmont was a fisherman and fiddler. He was often accompanied by his wife Béatrice on the pump organ. A more extensive bio, as well as photos and recordings that were collected by folklorist Georges Arsenault can be found on the excellent website devoted to Prince Edward Island fiddlers: Bowing Down Home

Albin Arsenault

Kith Folk

Photo by Georges Arsenault

Photo by Georges Arsenault

Albin Arsenault was born and lived his whole life in Cap-Egmont, PEI. He worked as a car mechanic and was a well-known and respected fiddler who played for weddings and parties. For photos and recordings that were collected by folklorist Georges Arsenault, go to Bowing Down Home

Adam LeBlanc

Kith Folk

Adam LeBlanc is a young fiddler and step dancer from Memramcook, New Brunswick. He started playing fiddle at 10 years of age and took lessons from Jocelyne Bourque, Christine Cormier and Samantha Robichaud. He has also been step dancing since he was 10 and has won numerous awards

Placide Odo

Kith Folk

Placide Odo, also known as P'tit Placide, was a very well respected fiddler from Chéticamp. Although he could not read a note of music, he played the fiddler very well and was often called upon to play for weddings and gatherings such as La Chandeleur. He was a contemporary of Joseph Larade and his brother Jacques (Jim) Odo was also a fiddler as well as a violon maker. There's a great article about the Odo fiddlers that appeared in the April/May 2007 issue of the Participaper (volume 28 #2), an Inverness County paper. 

Sébastien Dol

Kith Folk

Sébastien Dol, born October 27, 1978 in Digby, Nova Scotia started playing fiddle rather late in life, when he was 16 or 17 years old. His uncle, Denis à Alfred Comeau and his cousin, Johnny Comeau were a big influence. He was also inspired to play by the video "Johnny à Denis à Alfred" from the collection "Le Son des Français d'Amérique"  watching his grandfather and Johnny playing. He likes to play a mixture of French, Cajun and Acadian tunes and played with the group "Feutchaque". To learn more about Sébastien, you can visit his Facebook page at Se Bas Tien Dol

Sébastien Dol est né le 27 octobre 1978 à Digby. In commença à jouer le violon assez tard, inspiré par son grand-père Alfred à Denis, ainsi que son oncle Denis à Alfred Comeau et son cousin Johnny Comeau. Son style de jeu est un mélange de trois cultures: la France, la Louisiane, et l'Acadie. "J'ai commencé tard, vers l'age de 16 ou 17 ans. Je joue le violon à cause que c'est dans ma famille. Quand j'étais p'tit, je me souviens vaguement de mon grand-père, Alfred à Denis, qui jouait du violon" (Entends-tu le Violon de Marie-Adèle Deveau)

Stéphane Boudreau

Kith Folk

Our search for Stéphane Boudreau started with a video of a Madelinot fiddler playing a great tune for the Mi-Carême celebration. Unfortunately, all the musicians wore masks and we had no idea who was playing the tune. Then we found another video where the same group of musicians were sitting in costume but without the masks. We send a copy of this video to our good friend Bertrand Déraspe and he told us that the fiddler in the video was Stéphane Boudreau, who had been one of his students and was his second cousin. The tune he was playing was Reel du Pic Dûre and Bertrand had taught it to him. The videos were made by Micheline Cyr, who made a whole series of YouTube video of the Mi-Carême celebrations of the Magdalen Islands. To view the videos, click on the links below:

Masked Musicians

Unmasked Musicians

 

 

 

On a trouvé le violoneux Stéphane Boudreau grâce à une vidéo des célébrations de la Mi-Carême aux Îles-de-la-Madeleine. On a demandé à notre ami Bertrand Déraspe s'il connaissait le violoneux et il nous a répondu que c'était Stéphane Boudreau, son petit cousin et un de ses anciens élèves. Le morceau qu'il joue s'appelle "le reel du Pic dûre".